Carry My Cariad

Wraps, slings and cwtched-up things

Danu woven wrap

For the Love of Linen

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Many aspects of slings are a matter of personal taste, especially when it comes to the different fibres used to weave a wrap. Some blends are definitely marmite, and perhaps linen more so than most. I feel it gets an unfair reputation in some circles, as too tough to carry small babies, prone to digging or lacking the mouldability of other blends.

First up, I’ll put it out there. I am a lover of linen. I like its strength, the way it lends backbone to even very light wraps, the way it breathes so you never feel too hot even in a multi-layered carry. I like the way it breaks down to incredible smooshy loveliness if you work long enough to soften it up. And I love the way it lets a wrap emit light, bringing a shimmery dimension to the weave, detailing the intricacies of the warp and weft as they intersect. Linen was the first fabric humans ever produced, and archaeologists have discovered flax fibre remnants dating back at least 36000 years. It is a beautiful plant with many uses, and because of this its production processes tend to be more environmentally sustainable than cotton.

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Flax flowers

Being a linen aficionado, it was great to read that a new wrap company were starting to produce wraps using Irish linen. Danu slings, based in Newry in Northern Ireland, launched in 2014 with the stunning Sky Songs wrap. Sky Songs is woven with linen made from locally produced Irish flax. Linen really is the national cloth of Ireland, and has been produced for centuries in both the north and south of the Isle.  Owner Maebh has said that she wants Danu to become known as the company for linen wraps, reviving a heritage that has been slowly declining since the start of the 20th century.  Early reviews suggested Danu wraps were medium-to-heavyweight, and while utterly beastly new from the box, quickly broke down to being sumptuous and blankety soft. I actively enjoy breaking in wraps, so I must admit this tempted me even more.

A lovely member of our Cwtch-Up sling group was treated to a Danu wrap for Christmas. Knowing their rep for having a long breaking-in period, she asked if anyone would be willing to have a go at softening it up before it was wrapped in paper and put under the Christmas tree.

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I was so pleased to have a chance to try a Danu in real life. I was the second person to have the wrap on its short holiday, so it was already significantly softer than I expected. The first thing I noticed was the wonderful interplay between the colours of the warp and weft threads in the design. The White Stag looked pretty on Danu’s website, but in real life it was simply stunning. The purple and teal cotton contrasting against white linen threads created an almost tapestry-like effect; close up the flecks of purple added a three-dimensional effect to the trees and deer adorning the wrap. From a distance the colours blended to appear a fresh sky-blue colour, delicately contrasting with the creamy backdrop. The reverse side shows the deer and trees in the creamy white linen, with the backdrop appearing a vivid blue-mauve from a distance.

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The White Stag – Caspian is part of Danu’s Narnia series, based on the novels of local author C.S. Lewis. The stag depicted on the wrap features in several of the Narnia chronicles as a mythical beast, rarely glimpsed, who will grant the wishes of anyone who captures him. The wrap design features intricate drawings of the stag running about amongst a variety of native trees. 02_04_01The artwork is drawn in a naïve style that has echoes of early European cave art – similar creatures adorn the walls of the famous Chauvet cave complex in southern France, the Cave of Forgotten Dreams in Werner Herzog’s extraordinary film of the same name. The stag as a symbol of wild nature is a recurring motif throughout Celtic art and literature right to the present day.

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This wrap felt heavy in hand, but its GSM is just 270g, placing it more in the midweight range. Even barely used, it was able to glide quite comfortably as I wrapped. It still had a tendency to stand proudly by itself if it wasn’t wrapped very tight, but each use helped draw it closer to its natural state of cushiony loveliness. I also braided it over and over, ran it through rings and steam ironed it twice. I knew that another wash, some time with a hot iron and a week of wear would have it pretty much done.

The design looked wonderful when wrapped, especially the dots along each rail, which are a hallmark of most Danu designs. imageThe pattern size and repeat is just right – not too large and not too small. It manages to be intricate without being busy – even in a fancy finish like Double Hammock Saltwater there is enough space between the motifs to create an uncluttered effect. I felt I could wear this with patterned or printed clothes without appearing completely demented – something I do occasionally fall foul of with other heavily patterned wraps!

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This wrap didn’t disappoint in terms of the support it offered – it was magnificent in a simple ruck and provided three hours of weightless front carrying during one particularly long Christmas shopping trip. And it also made an amazing backdrop for D’s Christmas photos, especially when she was dressed in her own little reindeer outfit.

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I only had the White Stag stay for four days before it went home to its rightful owner. It’s fair to say I fell in love with Danu from this brief vacation. For such a small company, they have an absolutely crazy release rate. Every other week Maebh lists new designs and colourways, and they now have five collections featuring a huge range of motifs.photo 4-1~2 A lot of the wraps are connected to the literary heritage of the region, including the Brontes and WB Yeats. I was born in Ireland and have an enduring love affair with the poets of the Isle, so I am keeping a close eye on the next releases in the Yeats collection. Seamus Heaney is pretty much my favourite writer of all time, and I can only dream of the ways his poetry could inspire a wrap. As a writer who continually unearthed the history of Northern Ireland and wove it so deftly into lines about the present, I’m sure Danu would do an amazing job of translating Seamus’ genius into a beautiful piece of textile art.

You can buy Danu wraps at www.danuworld.com

Huge thanks to Kristina for letting me borrow her wrap and review it here x

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4 thoughts on “For the Love of Linen

  1. Pingback: Heavyweight wrapping | Carry My Cariad

  2. Pingback: Heavenly heavyweights | Carry My Cariad

  3. Pingback: Modern fibres woven with age-old artistry | Carry My Cariad

  4. Just want to say what a beautiful post this is. I never managed to wrap first baby, having bought a too-long, difficult stretch-hybrid, plus little one didn’t seem to enjoy being confined, and I really feel we both missed out. Hoping to rectify this with wovens for number two 🙂

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